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What to see in England



City of Bath
Avon

City of Bath

Founded by the Romans as a thermal spa, Bath became an important centre of the wool industry in the Middle Ages. In the 18th century, under George III, it developed into an elegant town with neoclassical Palladian buildings, which blend harmoniously with the Roman baths.

Derwent Valley Mills
Derbyshire

Derwent Valley Mills

The Derwent Valley in central England contains a series of 18th- and 19th- century cotton mills and an industrial landscape of high historical and technological interest. The modern factory owes its origins to the mills at Cromford, where Richard Arkwright's inventions were first put into industrial-scale production. The workers' housing associated with this and the other mills remains intact and illustrate the socio-economic development of the area.

Durham Castle and Cathedral
County of Durham

Durham Castle and Cathedral

Durham Cathedral was built in the late 11th and early 12th centuries to house the relics of St Cuthbert (evangelizer of Northumbria) and the Venerable Bede. It attests to the importance of the early Benedictine monastic community and is the largest and finest example of Norman architecture in England. The innovative audacity of its vaulting foreshadowed Gothic architecture. Behind the cathedral stands the castle, an ancient Norman fortress which was the residence of the prince-bishops of Durham.

Liverpool – Maritime Mercantile City
Liverpool

Liverpool – Maritime Mercantile City

Six areas in the historic centre and docklands of the maritime mercantile City of Liverpool bear witness to the development of one of the world’s major trading centres in the 18th and 19th centuries. Liverpool played an important role in the growth of the British Empire and became the major port for the mass movement of people, e.g. slaves and emigrants from northern Europe to America. Liverpool was a pioneer in the development of modern dock technology, transport systems, and port management. The listed sites feature a great number of significant commercial, civic and public buildings, including St George’s Plateau.

Ironbridge Gorge
Shropshire

Ironbridge Gorge

Ironbridge is known throughout the world as the symbol of the Industrial Revolution. It contains all the elements of progress that contributed to the rapid development of this industrial region in the 18th century, from the mines themselves to the railway lines. Nearby, the blast furnace of Coalbrookdale, built in 1708, is a reminder of the discovery of coke. The bridge at Ironbridge, the world's first bridge constructed of iron, had a considerable influence on developments in the fields of technology and architecture.

Maritime Greenwich
London Borough of Greenwich

Maritime Greenwich

The ensemble of buildings at Greenwich, an outlying district of London, and the park in which they are set, symbolize English artistic and scientific endeavour in the 17th and 18th centuries. The Queen's House (by Inigo Jones) was the first Palladian building in England, while the complex that was until recently the Royal Naval College was designed by Christopher Wren. The park, laid out on the basis of an original design by André Le Nôtre, contains the Old Royal Observatory, the work of Wren and the scientist Robert Hooke.

Saltaire
West Yorkshire

Saltaire
Saltaire, West Yorkshire, is a complete and well-preserved industrial village of the second half of the 19th century. Its textile mills, public buildings and workers' housing are built in a harmonious style of high architectural standards and the urban plan survives intact, giving a vivid impression of Victorian philanthropic paternalism.

Stonehenge, Avebury and Associated Sites
Wiltshire

Stonehenge

Stonehenge and Avebury, in Wiltshire, are among the most famous groups of megaliths in the world. The two sanctuaries consist of circles of menhirs arranged in a pattern whose astronomical significance is still being explored. These holy places and the nearby Neolithic sites are an incomparable testimony to prehistoric times.

Studley Royal Park including the Ruins of Fountains Abbey
North Yorkshire

Studley Royal Park

A striking landscape was created around the ruins of the Cistercian Fountains Abbey and Fountains Hall Castle, in Yorkshire. The 18th-century landscaping, gardens and canal, the 19th-century plantations and vistas, and the neo-Gothic castle of Studley Royal Park, make this an outstanding site.

Tower of London
London Borough of Tower Hamlets

Tower of London

The massive White Tower is a typical example of Norman military architecture, whose influence was felt throughout the kingdom. It was built on the Thames by William the Conqueror to protect London and assert his power. The Tower of London – an imposing fortress with many layers of history, which has become one of the symbols of royalty – was built around the White Tower.

Westminster Palace, Westminster Abbey and Saint Margaret's Church
City of Westminster, London

Westminster Abbey

Westminster Palace, rebuilt from the year 1840 on the site of important medieval remains, is a fine example of neo-Gothic architecture. The site – which also comprises the small medieval Church of Saint Margaret, built in Perpendicular Gothic style, and Westminster Abbey, where all the sovereigns since the 11th century have been crowned – is of great historic and symbolic significance.

Blenheim Palace
Oxfordshire

Blenheim Palace

Blenheim Palace, near Oxford, stands in a romantic park created by the famous landscape gardener 'Capability' Brown. It was presented by the English nation to John Churchill, first Duke of Marlborough, in recognition of his victory in 1704 over French and Bavarian troops. Built between 1705 and 1722 and characterized by an eclectic style and a return to national roots, it is a perfect example of an 18th-century princely dwelling.

Canterbury Cathedral, St Augustine's Abbey, and St Martin's Church
County of Kent

Canterbury Cathedral

Canterbury, in Kent, has been the seat of the spiritual head of the Church of England for nearly five centuries. Canterbury's other important monuments are the modest Church of St Martin, the oldest church in England; the ruins of the Abbey of St Augustine, a reminder of the saint's evangelizing role in the Heptarchy from 597; and Christ Church Cathedral, a breathtaking mixture of Romanesque and Perpendicular Gothic, where Archbishop Thomas Becket was murdered in 1170.

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Where to stay in
England



Ashby de la Zouch

Bath

Berkshire

Berwick on Tweed

Birmingham

Blackpool

Bournemouth

Bradford

Brighton

Bristol

Bude

Burnham Deepdale

Cambridge

Canterbury

Charlton

Chester

Chorley

Coalport

Cornwall

Coventry

Derby

Dover

Durham

East Sussex

Epworth

Essex

Exeter

Folkestone

Gateshead

Gatwick

Gloucestershire

Guernsey

Harlow

Harrow

Hastings

Hawes

Haworth

Heathrow

Hexham

Hounslow

Jersey

Kent

Keswick

Lake District

Ledbury

Lee Valley - Stansted Airport

Leeds

Liverpool

London

Luton

Manchester

Middlesbrough

Middlesex

Newcastle upon Tyne

Newquay

North Yorkshire

Nottingham

Oxford

Oxfordshire

Penzance

Plymouth

Portsmouth

Reading

Royston

Salisbury

Southampton

St Ives

Stansted

Stratford-upon-Avon

Surrey

Torquay

Warwick

Winchester

Windermere

Windsor

York








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