Cheap-Hostels.org
   EuroEducation's Guide to Student & Youth Hostels  
 


CHEAP HOSTELS IN GREECE

Easy and quick online booking.
Use the Search Box below to compare hostel prices at a glance.

 

What to see in Greece



Acropolis, Athens
Prefecture and Region of Attica

Acropolis, Athens

Illustrating the civilizations, myths and religions that flourished in Greece over a period of more than 1,000 years, the Acropolis, the site of four of the greatest masterpieces of classical Greek art – the Parthenon, the Propylaea, the Erechtheum and the Temple of Athena Nike – can be seen as symbolizing the idea of world heritage.

Archaeological Site of Delphi
Prefecture of Phokis, Region of Central Greece

Archaeological Site of Delphi

The pan-Hellenic sanctuary of Delphi, where the oracle of Apollo spoke, was the site of the omphalos, the 'navel of the world'. Blending harmoniously with the superb landscape and charged with sacred meaning, Delphi in the 6th century B.C. was indeed the religious centre and symbol of unity of the ancient Greek world.

Archaeological Site of Epidaurus
Prefecture of Argolis, Region of the Peloponnesos

Archaeological Site of Epidaurus

In a small valley in the Peloponnesus, the site of Epidaurus sprawls out over several levels. The cult of Asclepius first began there in the 6th century B.C., but the principal monuments, particularly the theatre – considered one of the purest masterpieces of Greek architecture – date from the 4th century. The vast site is a tribute to the healing cults of Greek and Roman times, with temples and hospital buildings devoted to its gods.
Archaeological Site of Olympia
Prefecture of Ilia, Region of West Greece in the Western Peloponnese

Archaeological Site of Olympia

The site of Olympia, in a valley in the Peloponnesus, has been inhabited since prehistoric times. In the 10th century B.C., Olympia became a centre for the worship of Zeus. The Altis – the sanctuary to the gods – has one of the highest concentrations of masterpieces from the ancient Greek world. In addition to temples, there are the remains of all the sports structures erected for the Olympic Games, which were held in Olympia every four years beginning in 776 B.C.

Delos
Prefecture of Cyclades, Region of the South Aegean

Delos

According to Greek mythology, Apollo was born on this tiny island in the Cyclades archipelago. Apollo's sanctuary attracted pilgrims from all over Greece and Delos was a prosperous trading port. The island bears traces of the succeeding civilizations in the Aegean world, from the 3rd millennium B.C. to the palaeochristian era. The archaeological site is exceptionally extensive and rich and conveys the image of a great cosmopolitan Mediterranean port.

Historic Centre (Chorá) with the Monastery of Saint John "the Theologian" and the Cave of the Apocalypse on the Island of Pátmos
Prefecture of Dodecanese, Region of the South Aegean

Island of Pátmos
The small island of Patmos in the Dodecanese is reputed to be where St John the Theologian wrote both his Gospel and the Apocalypse. A monastery dedicated to the 'beloved disciple' was founded there in the late 10th century and it has been a place of pilgrimage and Greek Orthodox learning ever since. The fine monastic complex dominates the island. The old settlement of Chorá, associated with it, contains many religious and secular buildings.

Medieval City of Rhodes
Prefecture of Dodecanese, Region of the South Aegean

Medieval City of Rhodes

The Order of St John of Jerusalem occupied Rhodes from 1309 to 1523 and set about transforming the city into a stronghold. It subsequently came under Turkish and Italian rule. With the Palace of the Grand Masters, the Great Hospital and the Street of the Knights, the Upper Town is one of the most beautiful urban ensembles of the Gothic period. In the Lower Town, Gothic architecture coexists with mosques, public baths and other buildings dating from the Ottoman period.

Monasteries of Daphni, Hossios Luckas and Nea Moni of Chios
Regions of Attica, Central Greece, North Aegean

Monasteries

Although geographically distant from each other, these three monasteries (the first is in Attica, near Athens, the second in Phocida near Delphi, and the third on an island in the Aegean Sea, near Asia Minor) belong to the same typological series and share the same aesthetic characteristics. The churches are built on a cross-in-square plan with a large dome supported by squinches defining an octagonal space. In the 11th and 12th centuries they were decorated with superb marble works as well as mosaics on a gold background, all characteristic of the 'second golden age of Byzantine art'.

Mystras
Prefecture of Laconia, Region of the Peloponnesos

Mystras

Mystras, the 'wonder of the Morea', was built as an amphitheatre around the fortress erected in 1249 by the prince of Achaia, William of Villehardouin. Reconquered by the Byzantines, then occupied by the Turks and the Venetians, the city was abandoned in 1832, leaving only the breathtaking medieval ruins, standing in a beautiful landscape.

Pythagoreion and Heraion of Samos
Prefecture of Samos, Region of the North Aegean

Pythagoreion and Heraion of Samos

Many civilizations have inhabited this small Aegean island, near Asia Minor, since the 3rd millennium B.C. The remains of Pythagoreion, an ancient fortified port with Greek and Roman monuments and a spectacular tunnel-aqueduct, as well as the Heraion, temple of the Samian Hera, can still be seen.

Temple of Apollo Epicurius at Bassae
Prefectures of Messenia, Arcadia, and Ilia in the Western Peloponnese

Temple of Apollo

This famous temple to the god of healing and the sun was built towards the middle of the 5th century B.C. in the lonely heights of the Arcadian mountains. The temple, which has the oldest Corinthian capital yet found, combines the Archaic style and the serenity of the Doric style with some daring architectural features.

Meteora
Prefecture of Trikala, Region of Thessaly

Meteora

In a region of almost inaccessible sandstone peaks, monks settled on these 'columns of the sky' from the 11th century onwards. Twenty-four of these monasteries were built, despite incredible difficulties, at the time of the great revival of the eremetic ideal in the 15th century. Their 16th-century frescoes mark a key stage in the development of post-Byzantine painting.

Mount Athos
Autonomous region of Mount Athos


An Orthodox spiritual centre since 1054, Mount Athos has enjoyed an autonomous statute since Byzantine times. The 'Holy Mountain', which is forbidden to women and children, is also a recognized artistic site. The layout of the monasteries (about 20 of which are presently inhabited by some 1,400 monks) had an influence as far afield as Russia, and its school of painting influenced the history of Orthodox art.

Choose your language
Francais Deutsch Italiano Castellano Cestina Dansk Nederlands Suomi Magyar norwegian Polski Portugues Svenska Chinese (Simplified)

Book with Cheap-hostels.org to get the
Best Online Rates EuroEducation has arranged
with Hostels worldwide

Savings of up to 70% on Hostels in Greece.
Great discounts on published Hostels rates.
Book your Hostel in Greece with Cheap-Hostel.org by clicking on the Hostel links below









 


Where to stay in
Greece



Aegina

Agios Nikolaos

Alexandroupolis

Alonissos

Andros

Argalasti

Athens

Chalkidiki

Chania

Chora

Corfu

Crete

Epirus

Evia

Fira

Gavdos

Gouvia

Hydra

Ios

Kalithies Rodou

Karpathos

Kefalonia

Kerkyra

Kissos

Kos

Lagonissi

Loutraki

Matala

Mykonos

Naoussa

Naxos

Olympia

Parga

Parikia

Paros

Pelion

Perivolos

Poros Island

Porto Heli

Rhodes

Roda

Samos

Santorini

Sifnos

Sithonia

Skiathos

Skyros

Syros

Thassos Island

Thessaloniki

Tinos

Tsilivi

Zakynthos

Zakyntos

Zante








Disclaimer || Contact Us
Copyright © Cheap-Hostels.org. All Rights Reserved